Standardized Patients


What are Standardized Patients?

Standardized Patients (SP) are healthy individuals trained to portray real patient symptoms and histories in a controlled setting.

SPs are selected based on their gender, age, and appearance to satisfy the case requirements for each session. They must memorize the scenarios of the case they are simulating, and convincingly portray a range of emotions.


Frequently asked questions

SPs are trained to play a role, whereas Volunteer Patients (VPs) participate as themselves, offering their real medical history.

Cases vary depending on the complexity of symptoms and background history. Some cases test the students’ history-taking skills. In such cases, SPs will memorize all the relevant medical history of the patient they are simulating. These could vary from headache to abdominal pain to chest pain. At times, the SP will be required to portray physical symptoms during the history-taking encounter (i.e. coughing).

Other cases are designed to test the students’ skills at performing physical exams. In this case, SPs will be examined by the students, and will be trained to portray the physical findings of this patient.

Usually, a couple of two-hour training sessions take place two weeks prior to simulation dates. Simulations range between 10-40 minutes, and SPs may do several simulations in one day.

SPs can work as many projects as they like, depending on availability and suitability to a given role. The IMP recruits SPs depending on the requirements of the cases, which vary from year to year.

SPs will receive an honorarium for their participation. These honorariums vary depending on the type of session they participate in.